Glass Fiber Reinforced Plastic – A Standard Name in The Building Industry

First researched and created in the mid-1930s’, Glass Fiber Reinforced Plastic has become a standard name in the building and construction industry. The intrinsic advantages of this product were realized when Disneyland’s “House of the Future” was attempted to be destroyed in the year 1967, 10 years after it was built. Surprisingly the ball that was used to wreck it merely bounced off the structure, without being able to destroy it, and only after this, were the amazing benefits of GFRP begun to be realized sheet piling contractors.

Today, GFRP is being used in various parts of the building industry, and builders are using it in ways that can perfectly meet their building needs, all in an aesthetic and appealing fashion. GFRP is an excellent heat insulator, and builders therefore use it as a heat insulation product in their constructions.

HOW IS GFRP FABRICATED?

The client’s needs and requirements are taken into account, while creating a design for the building.

A mold is first made – of fiberglass, wood, steel or rubber, depending upon what exactly is in the design. The mold gets filled with a very accurately mixed combination of polyester (or epoxy resin) and alkali-resistant glass fibers. This mixture can be molded into any shape or structure.

WHAT ARE THE APPLICATIONS OF GFRP?

GFRP can be used in both interior and exterior finishes using a variety of styles, textures and shapes – either in new buildings or even in restoring old structures.

USES:

In columns, fountains, domes, moldings, entryways, gateways, planters, sculptures, facades, porticos, signs, roofs, patios etc.

WHY IS GFRP SO POPULAR?

GFRP is used as a secure solution for many needs, especially as heat insulation products in the building industry. This is largely because of its many attractive features, such as:

High Strength- GFRP has a very high strength to weight ratio. Remember the House of the Future- it could not get destroyed easily!

Lightweight- GFRP is wonderfully lightweight, as low as weighing 2 to 4 pounds per square foot, this means that it can get installed easily, without much shipping costs and it needs lesser structural framing.

One-piece construction- Domes, moldings, cupolas etc. can be resined together to form a one-piece, strong and water-resistant structure.

Durable- There have been reports that GFRP has withstood even violent hurricanes with remarkable ease.

Low maintenance – It has been reported that there has been no loss of laminate properties in GFRP, even after 30 years, making it a strong candidate for durability.

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